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Wednesday, February 26
 

TBA

Environmental Protection Agency at Research Triangle Park EPA Air Quality Labs
The EPA at Research Triangle Park is the agency’s hub for air quality research and regulation. State-of-the-art labs support a diversity of research centers:

EPA research scientists will be on-site to discuss their work. The RTP campus is also one of the largest “green” buildings in the country.
Spaces: 6 currently, more possible with carpooling
Time: Afternoon, TBD
Transportation: Provided for up to 6 currently

Register for the tour of the EPA at RTP here.


Wednesday February 26, 2014 TBA
Field Trip

1:00pm

Walking Tour of the Downtown Raleigh Stormwater Tunnels
Go underground, and you get a SciO hard hat souvenir! Scott Huler, author of On the Grid which explores modern stormwater management, will lead a small group of adventurers into Raleigh’s stormwater infrastructure. Scott promises to show off “some of the nuttier elements of the Raleigh stormwater system — and yes, that means underground … ish.”

Advice from Scott: “You’ll need to bring your own flashlight and a camera of one sort or another (if you like), and given that many of the places we’ll be walking will have a couple inches of flowing water, you’ll need to either put plastic grocery bags in a pair of hiking boots (my solution) or bring waterproof boots of one sort or another. Or just get wet feet, if you promise not to complain. Note — this is NOT SEWAGE — this is storm water. Which, what with the fertilizer and the brake dust and the pet waste and whatnot I wouldn’t drink, but I wouldn’t worry too much about splashing around in either.”
[Stormwater Film Festival via Scientific American/Scott Huler]
Spaces: 12
Leave hotel 1:00, return 4:00
Transportation: Walking Tour
Fee: $20, includes hard hat

Register and pay for the Stormwater tour here.


Q&A Moderator
SH

Scott Huler

Scientific American


Wednesday February 26, 2014 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Field Trip

1:15pm

Duke University Duke Immersive Virtual Environment – DiVE
Affectionately referred to as the Holodeck, the DiVE is a virtual reality environment that allows scientists to immerse themselves in their research. From the DiVE website: “The DiVE is a 3mx3mx3m stereoscopic rear projected room with head and hand tracking and real time computer graphics. All six surfaces – the four walls, the ceiling and the floor – are used as screens onto which computer graphics are displayed. The DiVE offers a fully immersive experience to the user, who literally walks into the virtual world.” Step inside the DiVE and be immediately transported to another place, from a 9000 year old archaeological site to the developing retina of an infant. “From flying through a neuro-chemical pathway, to standing in an ancient roman villa, virtual reality gives us the opportunity to engage in formerly inaccessible experiences.”
Spaces: 18
Leave hotel 1:15, tour 2-3, return 4:00
Contact: Chris Smith, cts14@duke.edu
Transportation: TBD
DiVE Fee: $10 (if 18 people sign up)
NOTE: Transportation and DiVE fee are subject to change. Tour subject to cancellation depending on interest, so get your friends to sign up!

Register and pay for the DiVE tour here.


Wednesday February 26, 2014 1:15pm - 4:00pm
Field Trip

1:15pm

Duke University Human Simulation and Patient Safety Center
The frontier of medical education is simulation. Duke’s medical simulation center features human simulation mannequins with major organ systems that respond to the environment and the medical students’ interventions. The Center is pioneering human simulation as a tool for clinical trials and in training research personnel for clinical trials. The simulation labs can also transform into surgery suites and clinical exam rooms. The Center is located in the Trent Semans Center for Health Education, a brand new, $53 million building, featuring the simulation labs which can also serve as clinical exam rooms and surgery suites.
Spaces: 14
Leave hotel 1:15, tour 2-3, return 4:00
Transportation: $15
NOTE: Fees are subject to change and tour subject to cancellation depending on interest, so get your friends to sign up! Register and pay for the Medical Simulation Center tour here.

Wednesday February 26, 2014 1:15pm - 4:00pm
Field Trip

1:45pm

Duke University Duke Lemur Center
Want to get close to a lemur? The world’s largest collection of lemurs outside of Madagascar is at the Duke Lemur Center. More than 240 lemurs across 18 species live on 80 acres of forest at Duke. See a tiny mouse lemur, strange aye-aye, athletic sifaka and iconic ring-tailed lemur up-close and personal. Watch them call, sleep, eat, groom from only inches away! Guests will get close to the world’s most endangered group of mammals on a behind-the-scenes tour of this living laboratory, where scientists study cognition, behavior, locomotion and so much more. More than just scientific research, the DLC also leads conservation projects in Madagascar from environmental education to reforestation. Researchers will also be on-site to discuss and demonstrate their work. You might even get to meet Maky, the Lemur Center mascot! [A(nother) Visit to the Duke Lemur Center by @drskyskull; Falling in Love with the World’s Most Endangered Primates by Christie Wilcox]
Spaces: 28
Leave hotel at 1:45 sharp, tour at 2:30-4, return by 5pm
Transportation Provided

Register for the Lemur Center tour here.


Wednesday February 26, 2014 1:45pm - 5:00pm
Field Trip

3:30pm

NC Museum of Natural Sciences Paleontology Lab
Get a behind-the-scenes look at the fascinating work of Dr. Lindsay Zanno, who recently made international news with her discovery of a giant carnivorous dinosaur, Siats meekerorum, that turned out to be one of the three largest dinosaurs ever found in North America. Siats (pronounced see-atch) was the apex predator of its time, and kept tyrannosaurs from assuming top predator roles for millions of years. Zanno is an NC State University paleontologist with a joint appointment at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences. [Expedition Live! blog Siats meekerorum]
;  Colossal New Predatory Dino Terrorized Early Tyrranosaurs]
Spaces: 12
Leave hotel at 3:30, tour 4-5pm, return at your own pace.
Transportation: Walking – The museum is about 6 blocks from the hotel.

Register for the NC Museum of Natural Sciences lab tour here.

Wednesday February 26, 2014 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Field Trip

3:30pm

North Carolina State University Human Physiology of Wearable Robotics Lab – PoWeR Lab
Because…exoskeletons for humans! Dr. Greg Sawicki’s PoWeR Lab looks to the human body for inspiration to design and develop robotic devices that you wear. State of the art equipment, infrared cameras and ultrasound imaging give the team a unique look at muscle/motor movement to design “carbon fiber boots” and prosthetics that can improve or restore locomotion. Dr. Sawicki recently received a grant from NIH to compare and develop robotic ankle exoskeletons for healthy and stroke-impaired locomotion. This lab will be an exciting prelude to our Saturday CONVERGE speakers who will talk about online collaborations that are developing 3D printed prosthetics.

Leave hotel at 3:30, tour 4-5pm, return 5:30 (tentative, waiting on lab to confirm)
Transportation: TBD
Register for the PoWeR Lab tour here.

Wednesday February 26, 2014 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Field Trip

3:30pm

North Carolina State University Forensic Anthropology “the Bone Lab”
See the science behind CSI! Visit the Osteology Lab – “the Bone Lab” – at NCSU where forensic anthropologist Dr. Ann Ross uses clues in a victim’s skeleton to gather information like identity and cause of death. The team is called upon to contribute to several tough forensic cases a year, but they also use their skill to support preventive policies against genocide. This is an opportunity to see actual forensic casework in progress! [Forensic Anthropology Gives Voice to Unidentified Remains, Robin Lloyd, Scientific American]
Spaces: 12
Tour begins at 4:00, Leaving conference hotel at 3:30, return to hotel at 5:30
Transportation: TBD

Register for the Forensic Anthropology lab tour here.


Wednesday February 26, 2014 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Field Trip

3:30pm

North Carolina State University Your Wild Life Lab
What’s city life like for the tiniest crawling creatures? Biologists at NC State University’s Your Wild Life program have some answers. Learn about the effects of urban warming on tree pests and how Hurricane Sandy disrupted life for New York City arthropods and ecosystems. Your Wild Life has earned worldwide attention not only for the quality of its science, but for how it involves the public in its research.
Spaces: Limit 12
Leave hotel at 3:40, tour 4-5pm, return by 5:30
Transportation: Carpool
Register for the tour of the Your Wild Life Lab here.

Wednesday February 26, 2014 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Field Trip
 
Thursday, February 27
 

8:00am

BREAKFAST
We'll have breakfast waiting for you each morning when you arrive at the McKimmon Center!

Menu includes crustless quiche, yogurt, fruit, granola, muffins, and much more. Oh, and coffee of course!

Outside the McKimmon Center you will find the Kona Chameleon Espresso Truck! At registration everyone will receipt a free drink ticket for a specialty coffee drink.

Thursday February 27, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

9:00am

Changing Challenges into Opportunities
A wheelchair didn’t stop Rebecca Tripp from doing field research in treetops with Dr. Meg Lowman (aka Canopy Meg). Rebecca will share about her experiences with a summer research project, conceived by Dr. Lowman, giving mobility challenged students the ability to focus on science by rethinking traditional “barriers” and creating opportunities for success.

You can hear a podcast about Rebecca here.
Read more about Rebecca in this summary of the Dec/Jan 2013/2014 Ability Magazine article Ability Magazine.

Dr. Meg Lowman has her own set of stories of charting a path through barriers and creating her own successes. Her research has taken her across the world and from the surface of the earth to the leafy tops of rain forest canopies. But she’s also journeyed along the career path of a scientist as a woman. Her stories of challenges, opportunities, and the work still to be done for diversity in science careers will give us a unique perspective on the issues and opportunities.

Read more about Meg on her ScienceOnline Board announcement.


CONVERGE Speaker
ML

Meg Lowman

California Academy of Sciences
Mantra: No child left indoors!


Thursday February 27, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am
CONVERGE Room (1cd) McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioConverge

10:00am

BREAK
Thursday February 27, 2014 10:00am - 10:30am
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

10:30am

1A Women In Science: Reaching Equilibrium
Most women entering a doctoral program say that they want to be professors. But only about one in five tenured professors is a woman. Why do the other women leave? Often, women are not comfortable talking about their experiences in public, but numbers do talk, as demonstrated in the recent blog post “Unsettling Stats about Women in Science.” How do we get more people to recognize the reasons why women leave science, and then compel people to enact change? What kinds of changes would encourage women to stay in science? We will be tackling these questions in this discussion and compiling our ideas in a Google Doc for use in the next day’s mini-hackathon, where participants will create infographics that bring light to these issues and potential solutions.

After the first hour, we'll move to Room 6 for those who want to talk in small groups and continue the discussion during the second session time slot.

Facilitator
KB

Katie Burke

Associate Editor, American Scientist
Science empowers people--the ability to create new knowledge is an inspiring and powerful tool. I want to make scientific knowledge more available to everyday people and to spawn discussion about issues in science in creative ways. As a scientist-turned-journalist, I want to learn more about digital storytelling.


Thursday February 27, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioWomen

10:30am

1B WISE UP (Women In Science & Engineering Under Pressure)
Women in Science and Engineering Under Pressure (WISE UP) is a group for women in the Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Science at NCSU. Come learn about WISE UP (a supportive community, with meetings to encourage an open exchange of issues, ideas, and information in an atmosphere of trust) and brainstorm about a starting group in your own area. If you already have a group that you are a part of, share your own stories of working together to create healthy academic, professional, and social environment for men and women in their fields. We will discuss how groups such as WISE UP can address these issues in a supportive, positive manner. We all face a multitude of pressures in both our personal and professional lives; let’s support each other and rise above it.

Facilitator

Thursday February 27, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioWISEUP

10:30am

1C Boundaries, Behavior, & Being an Ally Discussion
This discussion will focus on identifying and communicating boundaries, dealing with inappropriate behavior, how to be an ally, and what to do when "no" is not enough. Ashley Simons-Rudolph is the director of NCSU's Women's Center. She will facilitate the attendee discussion.

Ashley Simons-Rudolph joined the Women’s Center in August 2011. She is an NC State Alumna and a graduate of one of the first classes of WGS minors. She earned her PhD in Gender and Social Policy from The George Washington University in Washington DC. Dr. S-R has been teaching online in the NCSU Women’s and Gender Studies department since 2003 and most recently taught at the American University in Cairo.  Her research interests include reproductive health, feminist economics, & international women’s issues.  She has over 15 years of experience in research, education, and advocacy related to gender equity.

Facilitator
AS

Ashley Simons-Rudolph

NC State University
NC State University, North Carolina, United States


Thursday February 27, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 6 McKimmon Center

10:30am

1D: Online Communication, Social Media, and the Law
Q&A with lawyer Amanda Martin.

Read about Amanda here:
http://smvt.com/attorneys/amanda-martin/

Thursday February 27, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioLaw

12:00pm

2A: Critical Science Writing: Helping readers become critical thinkers of science
Science writers must walk a careful line. On the one hand, we play the role of science cheerleader, as we know science is one of the best tools available for answering difficult and important questions. On the other hand, the scientific method is not perfect. Not only do we do our readers a disservice if we share news about scientific findings without explaining possible caveats and limitations, but we also undermine their trust in us. This session will explore how science writers can write about science honestly, sharing both its strengths and its weaknesses with audiences in a way that keeps them engaged, builds their confidence in us and helps them understand science more deeply.

Facilitator
avatar for Melinda Wenner Moyer

Melinda Wenner Moyer

Freelance science & health writer
I'm a freelance writer focused on science, health and nutrition, as well as the parenting columnist for Slate.


Thursday February 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioCritSci

12:00pm

2B: What is Science Literacy?
This session aims to explore “scientific literacy,” and how this concept can inform science communication efforts. It atempts to address the challenges that come with a term that inherently sounds vague. Part of this is due to the concept itself being always in a state of relentless change – which has a lot to do with differing opinions from academics and on-the-ground experts; as well as the current information ecosystem, with its media challenges, a shifting science culture, and also (unfortunately) because of the subversive activities from the likes of L.P.W.L.T.B.L.’s (loud people who like to be loud), P.W.S.P.O.M.I.’s (people with strong political or monetary interests), and of course, the D.C.D.s (dangerously clueless douchebags). In all, I’m hoping the session will provide a guided outlet for folks to share their opinions and expertise on this topic, and whether such techniques are useful (or not) in a variety of settings (i.e. journalism, education, PR, advocacy, policy).

Facilitator
avatar for David Ng

David Ng

Faculty Member, University of British Columbia
Molecular Geneticist who fancies himself a science literacy advocate. Happy as a faculty member at the University of British Columbia, with a soft spot for science humour and Chewbacca (though not necessarily at the same time). Looking after a science education lab (http://bioteach.ubc.ca), managing a few unconventional science literacy projects (http://phylogame.org), and doing a little writing here and there (http://popperfont.net).


Thursday February 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioSciLit

12:00pm

2D: Covering Big Science when it’s also Big Business
How do you approach science stories that come from corporate laboratories? Are you subconsciously (or consciously) skeptical of results and conclusions when talking to scientists who work in the private sector? Do you assume they have an agenda?

Are scientists and PR staff at large corporations nervous about the media's agenda when they release a story? Do they have to worry that each story about a new discovery will come with a discussion of any controversies or challenges the company has faced in the past? How can we build trust on both sides of the story and help promote science communication as a whole?​

Facilitator
avatar for David Butler

David Butler

Web Marketing Manager, Alltech
I am a musician / environmental geologist / web geek. I work in web marketing and social media for Alltech, which is a company that makes yeast, algae, fish, whiskey, beer and coffee. What else could you possibly need? We help farmers grow healthier food, protect the environment and make a profit.


Thursday February 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioSciBiz

12:00pm

2E: Non-English Science Communication
English has become the internationally accepted language for research communication; the vast majority of international scientific publications are in English, international collaborations are mostly carried in English, and online scientific content for non-scientists is overwhelmingly in English. While is fair to think that eventually English proficiency will become one of the multiple skills required by the scientific trade, the global audiences will not become English-literate in the near future. Are we failing to engage a majority of audiences by not going beyond English science communication?

Facilitator
avatar for Ivan Fernando Gonzalez

Ivan Fernando Gonzalez

www.ScienceSalsa.com
Science, multiculturalism, community. | English & Español


Thursday February 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 8a McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioLang

12:00pm

2F: Design Thinking and Innovation for Science Communication
Design thinking refers to the methods and processes for investigating ill-defined problems, acquiring information, analyzing knowledge, and positing solutions.” – Wikipedia. Sounds like a good fit for science communication, right? There is a lot for science communicators to learn from designers and their way of thinking. Design isn’t just about making things look pretty, so let that misapprehension fade away. It’s a way of thinking about problems with a focus on action and solution. It involves empathy, creativity, and rationality in equal doses. A typical design thinking process might go: define, research, ideate, prototype, choose, implement, and learn. Notice the elements of research, prototyping, and learning hiding in there—areas that a lot of science communication fails at in the development process.

Facilitator
avatar for David Harris

David Harris

University of California, Santa Cruz


Thursday February 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 8b McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioDesign

12:00pm

2G: Alternate Careers in Science
Not every science graduate student will stay in academia. In fact, that is the minority. Science PhDs end up in industry, they work as teachers, lawyers, writers, entrepreneurs, politicians, and creative professionals. Many of those jobs are not addressed as possible options to graduate students, yet we welcome scientific representation in a wide range of fields, from screenwriting to politics. Can we make graduate students in the sciences feel confident about their abilities to find the career they want – even if they have never met anybody with that job? Are there changes underway in universities’ attitudes to training graduate students? How can we help inform students about their options post-graduation? How do we address stigma? Does vocabulary like “alternative careers” and “leaky pipeline” affect student career choices? This discussion welcomes contribution from anyone interested in discussing careers for science graduates.

Facilitator
avatar for Eva Amsen

Eva Amsen

Outreach Director, F1000Research


Thursday February 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 10 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioAlt

1:00pm

LUNCH: Meet a new friend
Thursday February 27, 2014 1:00pm - 2:30pm
CONVERGE Room (1cd) McKimmon Center

2:30pm

3D: The Science of Everything: Bringing Science to Popular Topics

Science infiltrates every part of our lives so, as communicators seeking outlets, we needn’t limit ourselves to science magazines or even science topics. For instance, the Olympics isn’t “science programming” but it does offer opportunities to discuss various science topics, in a popular context that already has an engaged audience. How else can we connect science to what people encounter in their everyday lives?  Food and cooking, health, parenting, beauty products, home maintenance--any of these topics could reveal an interesting science angle and also suggest a new (non-science) venue to pitch a story. Let’s talk about creative ways to bring science to the people - in print, web, or video venues - or physical venues like science festivals and cafes. We can expand the scope of our market and find new ways to engage people with science.


Facilitator
BM

Brian Malow

Science Comedian, ScienceComedian.com
A temporary manifestation of the evolving DNA molecule. | ScienceComedian.com | @sciencecomedian | YouTube.com/sciencecomedian


Thursday February 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioSciAll

2:30pm

3A: Expanding the dialogue on Diversity
Expanding the dialogue on diversity and broadening participation of minorities (gender, sexual orientation, ability, religion, and ethnicity) includes addressing the role that social and economic barriers play on who is able to participate in science, technology, and engineering (STEM). This panel will address how the intersection of class and other minority labels must be considered in 21st Century STEM outreach and inclusion efforts. Addressing & admitting how privilege affects WHO has access to STEM education & opportunities is a very important part of the solution to plugging up the leaky pipeline.The goals of the session will be to 1) define privilege and examine the different types of privileges we each may have, 2) elucidate the small but insidious ways prejudices around privilege allow some to become successful in science and discourage others, and 3) offer real tactics for individuals (to share with others) to make science and science communication more accessible to all students.

Facilitator

Thursday February 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioDiversity

2:30pm

3B: Online Tools: What do we use?
As online communicators, we use online tools for nearly every aspect of our jobs. From collaboration to task management, data tracking to conference calls, a spectrum of tools is available to make our lives easier, and our world more connected. The trick is finding the right tool for the job. In this session we’ll discuss the online tools we use to enhance our performance and lighten our work load. We’ll get to the bottom of which tools work best for our needs, and talk about challenges we face when using these tools (and hopefully how to overcome them!).


Facilitator

Thursday February 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioTools

2:30pm

3E: Bringing Your Scientific Professional Society into social media age
Are you a member or communication staff with a society? Follow AAAS on twitter to get the hottest science? Then this session is for you. Societies are entering the social media age. In the old days, journals were the science communication method, but today societies are blogging and getting LinkedIn. Their conferences have hashtags. Their journals now tweet. You will drive the conversation because I’m just the facilitator, but here are a few topics that might come up. Teaching society members social media. Blog for your society. Tweeting hot science and connecting with journalists. Beyond tweeting hot science – what else to talk about on social media? More citations!!! Getting research noticed online. Using social media for professional development, job boards, science policy new, etc. What is fair game for science society social media? Crossing the (grey) line between science and opinion when you only have 140 characters.

Facilitator

Thursday February 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 8a McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioSociety

2:30pm

3F: Collaborative Online Journalism
There's a long standing picture of a journalist being a rogue reporter - a loner who gathers the facts, gets the good interviews and then sits alone in a room with books crafting a beautiful, compelling story. There are journalists like that. They are incredible. But not everybody is a lone wolf. Some of us like to work with people, do weird projects, figure stuff out together. Some want to tell stories with people, in weird ways, that don't just come from one singular brain but that come from a whole bunch of brains working together. But while that might sound really fun and awesome, actually executing it is really hard. This session is more brainstorm session than lecture - bring your ideas and suggestions for how to do projects (journalistic or otherwise) together. How do you find partners? How do you trust them? Who gets the byline? How do you pitch a collaborate project? When do you call it off? When do you call it done? Bring your ideas and we can talk about them, together.

Facilitator
avatar for Rose Eveleth

Rose Eveleth

Freelance Journalist, roseveleth.com
Rose Eveleth is a journalist who covers how humans tangle with science and technology. She’s the host and producer of Flash Forward, a podcast about the future, and has covered everything from fake tumbleweed farms to sexist prosthetics.


Thursday February 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 8b McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioCollab

2:30pm

3G: Communicating the process of Science
This session will focus on how to communicate that science is a process, and why that matters to the public understanding of science. For example, grasping the concept of uncertainty, or the recursive aspects of the scientific method. Some people think that the "how" is boring, but it needn't be! So much in science is about the questions, and not the results. But often the process is slow and messy and doesn’t fit conventional narrative structures. So how do we tell engaging stories about the process of science? What would be good tools, technical (Storify?) and methodological (narrative)? How can we use process to provide context, move beyond the "paper-of-the-week“ and develop longform techniques in journalism? In short: How can we follow the science as it unfolds?

Facilitator

Thursday February 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 10 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioProcess

3:30pm

BREAK
Thursday February 27, 2014 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

4:00pm

4A: Healthy Online Promotion
Most science communicators don’t have a publicist. If you want to get noticed, self-promotion is often the only option – but it’s also fraught with reputational risks. You have a Facebook page and a Twitter account, but how do you effectively strengthen your public image as an expert or a resource without going overboard? Further, how do you know you’re doing it right? This session will provide tools to help you think systematically and strategically about your public image and reputation while staying true to yourself. We will share tips and resources on how to identify the right opportunities for you, how to build important relationships to strengthen and protect your reputation, how to get the most out of your public interactions, and how to measure success. We will also discuss how background, gender, race or class can affect engagement and reputation.

Facilitator

Thursday February 27, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioSelfPR

4:00pm

4B: Post-Publication Peer Review on the web: Benefits, risks and ways forward
The past few years have seen the rise of anonymous sites dedicated to post-publication peer review and critiques. One of the most aggressive, Science-Fraud.org, for example, identified a number of papers that were corrected and retracted, but was shut down following legal threats. But there have been other entrants, such as PubMed Commons and PubPeer. The latter, which allows anonymous comments because junior scientists may fear reprisals, led to the correction of a high-profile stem cell cloning paper in Cell, among others. Some are even arguing for all of peer review to take place after an article is posted, saying that increased specialization by researchers, and an avalanche of studies published every week, means traditional peer review is less likely to be effective. We’ll look at these issues, including best practices (subtitle: how to avoid lawsuits), how to foster constructive criticism, and how anonymity and blogging fit into the mix.

Facilitator
IO

Ivan Oransky

Retraction Watch


Thursday February 27, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioReview

4:00pm

4C: How Traditional Primary Research Literature needs to change w online usage expectations
Many of us at ScienceOnline read primary research literature, but even here, the audience of readers is quite diverse. We range from high school students to professors of PhD students; we include journalists and public relations experts; some of us are science fans with no scientific training. Is there a way for teachers and/or journalists to teach readers not only how to read the scholarly literature, but also how to be skeptical of science? How can scientists help non-experts understand their work? Finally, how do we access the primary literature? How can we encourage publishers and authors to participate in more open access publishing, and is that realistic? What are other ways that students, faculty, journalists, and the general public can access the primary literature?

Facilitator
avatar for Stephanie Brown

Stephanie Brown

Librarians! Cognitive Science! Journalism! Social Media!


Thursday February 27, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 6 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioTradLit

4:00pm

4D: Fighting Burnout (when dealing w pseudoscience, climate science, conservation, etc)
As scientists and science communicators we are on the front lines of sharing new information with the world in a way that is relevant and compelling. We believe that this is important. But daily we are faced with a lack of trust in science, online trolling, and the distortion or misuse of scientific research – or no use at all – for decision-making. Moreover, often the science itself is a serious bummer. What do we do when sharing science seems pointless, or thwarted from all sides? What keeps us going? In this session we will focus on the causes of and the solutions to burnout, and how we might cultivate individual resilience and optimism in the practice of science communication.

Facilitator
avatar for Jennifer Davison

Jennifer Davison

Program Manager, Urban@UW, University of Washington
Jennifer Davison connects people and ideas across perspectives to help us realize a more sustainable and resilient world. With experience in software development, climate science, communications, and wilderness guiding, Davison develops collaborations to address complex issues: from helping environmental scientists share their work with decision-makers, to catalyzing conversations between community leaders and scholars on such topics as climate... Read More →


Thursday February 27, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioHope

4:00pm

4F: Beyond the Press Release: Developing Online Press Materials
“Beyond the Press Release: Developing Online Press Materials” will be a group discussion about online press materials – the stuff that public information officers (PIOs) make available to reporters online. What do reporters want or need in an online press package? What do PIOs think reporters want or need? And what do scientists make of all this? We want this to be an open conversation. We need reporters to show up, so that we can learn what they want. This is in the best interests of reporters because it can change the behavior of PIOs to make things easier for reporters! We also want to hear about best practices from PIOs.

Facilitator
avatar for Matt Shipman

Matt Shipman

Science writer/PIO, North Carolina State University


Thursday February 27, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 8b McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioPress

4:00pm

4G: Reporting Incremental Science in a World that wants Big Results
What makes a scientific story "newsworthy", other than someone deciding to cover it? Big breakthroughs are rare and sometimes only recognized as such years after the fact. Ordinary science works incrementally and even conversationally. If we throw out the idea that every discovery needs to be groundbreaking or (ptui!) paradigm-shifting, maybe we can convey some of the workings of normal science. And in the process, we can help non-scientists understand the workings of research. This discussion will focus on examples and ideas on how to do this kind of reporting right (rather than dragging out examples of hyped-up stories). We will talk about how to take preliminary, marginal, or otherwise ordinary results and place them in their proper contexts.

Facilitator

Thursday February 27, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 10 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioBigSci

4:00pm

4E: How Psych Research can inform effective communication
Many ScienceOnline attendees ask questions about effective communication strategies and how to be persuasive, and a lot of these conversations end up being based around anecdotes and personal experiences. However, as social psychologists, we have data on this sort of thing! In this session, we will be discussing empirical research from the domains of cognition, communication, risk perception, persuasion, and more. After sharing some relevant empirical findings from these domains and the ways in which these findings could be applied to help improve science communication practices, use we will particularly welcome any questions that attendees might have regarding whether or not certain studies/findings exist, empirically supported “best practices,” and discussion about the ethical implications of applying these academic findings to the real world.


Thursday February 27, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 8a McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioPsych

6:30pm

Dinner Groups
Dinner groups will be organized with the Google Doc linked below.  You will find a variety of menus and budgets (attendees cover the cost of their own meal). Each dinner group will have a host and we welcome everyone to choose a group to join.

Sign up for a Dinner Group here

Thursday February 27, 2014 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Downtown Raleigh

8:30pm

Scio14 Game Night
Join your fellow attendees to play board games and card games. We'll have late night snacks. Bring your own geeky games!

Got a game or want to help out? Add your info to this Google Doc and stay in touch with David Harris (@physicsdavid)

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AjviyYKmF4__dDQxWE5fVWZtRFRsa2k1bkZUdWVGVVE&usp=sharing

Thursday February 27, 2014 8:30pm - Friday February 28, 2014 1:00am
Magnolia Room Sheraton
  • Hashtag #scioGames
 
Friday, February 28
 

8:00am

BREAKFAST
We'll have breakfast waiting for you each morning when you arrive at the McKimmon Center!

Menu includes crustless quiche, yogurt, fruit, granola, muffins, and much more. Oh, and coffee of course!

Outside the McKimmon Center you will find the Kona Chameleon Espresso Truck! At registration everyone will receipt a free drink ticket for a specialty coffee drink.

Friday February 28, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

9:00am

Reaching Diverse Audiences
From comics to animations to reaching different cultures. Today's CONVERGE speakers will share their experiences about reaching diverse audience, cultures, and interests.

Jorge Cham (PhD Comics)

  • Jorge is the creator of “PHD Comics”, the popular comic strip about life (or the lack thereof) in Academia. He is also the co-founder of PHDtv, a video science and discovery outreach collaborative, and a founding board member of Endeavor College Prep, a non-profit school for kids in East L.A. He earned his Ph.D. in Robotics from Stanford University and was an Instructor and Research Associate at Caltech from 2003-2005. He is originally from Panama.
  • To read his comic strip, click here.
  • To learn about the research he used to do, click here.
  • Read his profile in Science Magazine.

Heather Bailey (TranslateHouse.org)

  • From the start of her career, Heather was concerned by the inequality and injustice in South Africa. From her early days in fashion design and retail buying she was already finding herself involved in small businesses and fair trade for South African crafters.
  • South Africa has 11 official languages making it rich in cultural diversity and challenges. Heather helped setup Translate to embrace this diversity in a time of liberation in the country’s history. The first focus was translating OpenOffice.org and Firefox to allow non-English speakers access to technology in their language. This had a great affect on other prominent software vendors starting to translate their software. As a result of this work Translate began building open source tools that could assist translators to translate more effectively.
  • Her next project was setting up ANLoc, the African Network of Localisers, building relationships with like-minded people working in languages across Africa.
  • Heather also works with the Rosetta Foundation, a global network of volunteer translators. The Rosetta Foundation’s aim is to enable access to information in your own language, a fundamental human right.

CONVERGE Speaker

Friday February 28, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am
CONVERGE Room (1cd) McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioConverge

10:00am

BREAK
Friday February 28, 2014 10:00am - 10:30am
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

10:30am

5A: Beyond Blogs, Twitter & FB: Using OTHER social media to find new audiences for science
In 2013, social media overtook porn as the #1 activity on the web. Without a doubt, social channels are the cornerstone of modern science communication, if not all of modern communication. But the social web of today is only the beginning. There are new audiences to reach, and an evolving whack-a-mole ecosystem of social networks and tools to keep track of. Will the Big Ones, Facebook and Twitter, always be the Big Ones? How do YouTube, Tumblr, Google+, Instagram, Snapchat (or whatever comes next) fit in to the present and future of science communication? Which work best, and for whom? Which are worth it, and why? We’ll discuss best practices, worst practices, whether Google+ will ever be a “thing”, and debate the correct pronunciation of “GIF”.

Facilitator
avatar for Joe Hanson

Joe Hanson

PBS Digital Studios
Addicted to wonder, constantly curious, often hungry. I make science videos for YouTube and science words for the internet.


Friday February 28, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioBeyond

10:30am

5B: Broadening participation of the disability community in online science

This discussion will focus on the challenges of tackling a career in science for those with various disabilities, including mobility limitations. Other groups to consider include the deaf community, autistic people, etc. The conversation will also discuss the “invisible glass ceiling” for many scientific professions. Many underserved audiences face similar challenges--including women and ethnic minorities--and we may find lessons and ideas from these groups to apply to the disability community. Let’s talk about ways that the online science community can become a catalyst for more inclusivity of individuals with disabilities in science professions.


Facilitator
ML

Meg Lowman

California Academy of Sciences
Mantra: No child left indoors!


Friday February 28, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioAble

10:30am

5C: Role of Social Media in Science News Reporting
Live tweeting meetings and events, Storifying scattered posts by diverse authors into coherent narratives, crowdsourcing for information and sources, using G+ Hangouts for interviews, and of course, blogging as publication in its own right: social media have become powerful new tools for science reporting. Come to this session prepared to discuss great examples of the media used right—and the new challenges for reporters and editors alike. How are news rooms that traditionally valued scoops and exclusives adapting to a reporting process that often works publicly and outside the brand? Does the use of social media alter audience's perceptions of the journalism's reliability, depth or coherence?

Facilitator

Friday February 28, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 6 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioNews

10:30am

5D: Blogging Policy in and out of the Beltway
Some scientists and science communicators have a keen interest in contributing to science policy discussions. Others inadvertently participate in science policy discussions by making informal policy recommendations via Tweets, blog posts and articles. While many scientists and science communicators expect policy to be evidence-based, only the savviest scientists understand how science actually contributes to policymaking and how to plug-in to be effective. Venues for participating in science policy are diverse and, in some cases, unexpected. Knowing your way around the science policy landscape can help you leverage your science for improved science policy at the local, state and national level. In this session, we will discuss how scientists and science communicators can best integrate their science into the policymaking process at all levels. We’ll also discuss the opportunities and risks of commenting on science policy.

Q&A Moderator
avatar for Jamie Vernon

Jamie Vernon

Policy Fellow, U.S. Department of Energy
Jamie Vernon is a PhD-trained molecular biologist with more than a decade of experience conducting discovery research and project management, author of multiple scientific publications and a biotechnology patent. | | He transitioned to the energy sector nearly 5 years ago, first as a freelance science writer, and subsequently as a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy (Office of Energy Efficiency and... Read More →
MH

Michael Halpern

Union of Concerned Scientists


Friday February 28, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioBeltway

10:30am

Workshop: Before the Camera: Thinking through your science video
In this session, Derek Muller of Veritasium and Henry Reich of MinutePhysics and MinuteEarth will take you through the most important phase of video creation: pre-production. They will discuss their processes for ideation, research and writing, showing the evolution of works from early drafts through to the finished product. Using personal examples, they will illustrate essential do's and don'ts . They will also workshop a video idea live in the session so bring your concepts and let's get to work! The workshop will be fun and flexible, adjusting to the goals of the participants. Henry and Derek are happy to answer any and all questions you may have.

LIMIT: 30

Register for the Before the Camera workshop here.

Workshop Leader
avatar for Derek Muller

Derek Muller

Founder, Veritasium
Science videos! | | Derek Muller is a passionate science educator, communicator, and filmmaker. He completed his bachelor’s in Engineering Physics at Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada and a PhD in Physics Education Research at the University of Sydney. Derek studied how to design multimedia to teach physics effectively. One of his major findings is that addressing misconceptions first is often essential to engage the... Read More →
HR

Henry Reich

Simply put: cool physics and other sweet science. Education. | | "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough." | ~Albert Einstein

Friday February 28, 2014 10:30am - 1:00pm
Room 10 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioPrep

10:30am

Workshop: Leveraging the power of Open Data on the Web w Ted Hart (rOpenSci)
The rate of scientific publication over the past several decades has gone from bendy straw to fire hose. The question for science communicators is how can they effectively search existing literature, discover new trends, and make sense of the impact new discoveries are having? Luckily much of this data is freely available on the web. Users just need the tools to access and process what's coming through the fire hose. rOpenSci (http://www.ropensci.org) is a group devoted to providing people with the tools to access open data. Within the R environment we have developed a series of packages that can help users search scientific literature and metadata. Our session will teach users how to download and search scholarly metadata or fulltext (for open publications like PLOS) and text mine it to tame the fire hose of publications and visualize text data. We will also cover how to download impact measurements from various article-level metrics providers. A basic working knowledge of R is a prerequisite.

Limit 24

Register for Open Data workshop here.

Workshop Leader
avatar for Ted Hart

Ted Hart

Developer, rOpenSci

Friday February 28, 2014 10:30am - 1:00pm
Room 8b McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioOpen

10:30am

Workshop: Narrative Workshop w Ben Lillie and Erin Barker (StoryCollider)
At the Story Collider we've built a lot of experience creating true, personal narratives around science In this workshop we'll share some of our techniques and tips for crafting narratives around the big science moments in your life and using them to connect with an audience. The bulk of the time will be for individual feedback for your own stories. Bring a story you've written, or write one in the workshop. Limit: 16

Register for the Narrative workshop here.

Workshop Leader
avatar for Ben Lillie

Ben Lillie

The Story Collider

Friday February 28, 2014 10:30am - 1:00pm
Room 8a McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioStory

11:30am

BREAK
Friday February 28, 2014 11:30am - 12:00am
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

12:00pm

6B: MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) and science online
Many in the ScioX community are involved in online (web-enhanced) teaching and learning. One type of online learning is through Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). In this #scioMOOC session we can discuss the experiences that participants have had with MOOCs as instructors, instructional designers, content creators or as students – and why they may have opted out of participating in MOOCs. We will discuss the benefits of MOOCs, and their drawbacks, including for those people that MOOCs are intended to serve or attract. Content delivery success, workload for content creators and instructors, learning outcomes for students and expense/benefit to the institution involved in MOOCs will be compared to face-to-face instruction and other online learning methods.

Facilitator
avatar for Marianne Alleyne

Marianne Alleyne

Director Online Teaching and Learning SIB, School of Integrative Biology


Friday February 28, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00am
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioMOOC

12:00pm

6C: Measuring Success in a Digital Landscape (Altmetrics)
Understanding the impact of your work will help guide your future research – and career progression. Traditional metrics of research impact have focused on citations of papers, however, there are many other ways to measure impact. The internet has irreversibly changed science publishing, and provides a wealth of data on how much a published paper is read, reused, and revered by the authors’ peers. These alternative (“alt”) metrics for measuring the impact of papers focus on more rapidly available data than citations. During this session we will discuss several article-level citation tracking tools available from Google, Microsoft, Elsevier and others. We’ll also discuss questions such as: What are the challenges ahead? Can altmetrics replace JIF and h-index and other metrics as measurements of output for the purpose of career advancement? What are some of the weaknesses of altmetrics? Is it possible to distinguish between “scholarly” and “sexy” research using altmetrics?

Facilitator
avatar for Cesar Berrios-Otero

Cesar Berrios-Otero

Outreach Director, F1000


Friday February 28, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 6 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioSuccess

12:00pm

6D: How to stay in the moment when covering live events online
With Twitter and other social media platforms becoming a larger and larger part of how people communicate, live-tweeting (or tweeting an event, talk or breaking news for other attendees and your followers) is rapidly becoming an integral part of any network's communication plan. But when you livetweet, how do you straddle the real world and the online world – keeping your brain in both places while your fingers do the walking to help you communicate? This session will address different live-tweeting strategies, uses for live-tweeting, solutions to common problems and more.

Facilitator
DM

David Manly

Annex Business Media
I have a Master's of Journalism from Carleton University, as well as an Honours Bachelor of Science from York University in Biology. I am currently working as a science journalist, and love every minute of it! I hope to one day write for Nature or Science, or work for the Discovery Channel or Animal Planet. I'm an identical twin, who loves to laugh and share stories with my friends and others I care for. I am also obsessed with learning about... Read More →


Friday February 28, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioLive

12:00pm

6A: Data-Based Communication: Insights from Science Communication Research
If we agree that science communication is essential for helping people make the best possible decisions, and we genuinely believe that the consequences of failing are severe – illness, death, catastrophe – then we must look to every available source of expertise that can improve our communication work. This is particularly urgent given how easily and inadvertently well-intentioned efforts can harden opinions, reinforce misperceptions, and deepen existing divides. That means looking not only to the work of storytellers, artists, and journalists, but also to the researchers who study communication. As a group, we’ve been skeptical: dense texts, terrible presentations, and questionable findings make us question the legitimacy of these ideas, or at least the return on investing in them. This Q&A session will focus on plain talk about what we really know, why paying attention to this research matters, and how we might apply it.

Q&A Moderator
LN

Liz Neeley

Assistant Director of Science Outreach, Compass


Friday February 28, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioSciComm

1:00pm

LUNCH: Hosted tables with Sponsors
Spend some time learning about a new tool, resource, organization, or company as you eat lunch with one of our sponsors.

Find a table/sponsor by looking through the list on posters we'll have in the lobby.

Friday February 28, 2014 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Lunch Room (2abc) McKimmon Center

2:30pm

7A: Social Media as a scientific research tool
The ScienceOnline community knows all about how to use social media tools for communicating scientific research to the public, but in this session, we will discuss how to use social media tools to conduct scientific research. We will discuss examples from various disciplines including economics, fisheries management, public health and public policy. We will focus on effective strategies and success stories for using these tools for research, as well as obstacles that these researchers face.

Facilitator
DS

David Shiffman

RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program


Friday February 28, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioResearch

2:30pm

7B: Virtual Events: How to do it well
The internet facilitates communication over great distances and enables us to "attend" an event happening anywhere on Earth or completely in virtual space. Sometimes we just want to share our "meatspace" experiences with the virtual world. From web chats to conferences to live broadcasts, how do we do virtual events, and how do we do them well? We'll discuss technology, platforms, moderation, archiving, and spreading the word about virtual events. What are your experiences? What would you like to see in the future? What bizarre idea would you like to try?

Facilitator
avatar for Nicole Gugliucci

Nicole Gugliucci

assistant professor, small college in New Hampshire


Friday February 28, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioVirtual

2:30pm

7C: Combatting Online Parasitism
Many of us have seen our work show up, unacknowledged, in unexpected places and contexts. Some websites are relentless stealers of content; others shamelessly use the work of others to attract eyeballs or turn a profit. These are the kleptoparasites of the science communication ecosystem. But amongst these offenders are some shining examples of responsible content-sharing and aggregation -- outlets whose borrowing benefits both the creators and the purveyors of the work. That's the kind of symbiotic relationship we should be aiming for. Here, we will draw upon session participants to develop strategies for combatting online parasitism and promoting healthy content-sharing. How can we fight back against the kleptoparasites? I'm really hoping this session will be about more than just finger-pointing and griping, so bring your best and most constructive anti-parasite ideas to the room.

Facilitator
avatar for Nadia Drake

Nadia Drake

Wired Science


Friday February 28, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 6 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioParasite

2:30pm

7D: Science Teaching Practices that can improve science communication
Everyone loves elementary school science, but somewhere along the way, and definitely by the time you're staying up late trying to memorize all the steps in the Krebs cycle, something goes horribly wrong. What aspects of science teaching do we want to AVOID in science communication? How can we go back to an elementary school model of science? Can we communicate science without sounding like an authority? And how can we try to ensure that our message is getting across and isn’t being forgotten? The good news is that teachers and writers have been thinking about these problems for ages, and they both have great ideas! In this session, let's try to find useful common ground between teaching and communication, and think about how we can use effective science teaching principles to make us better science communicators.

Facilitator

Friday February 28, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioImprove

2:30pm

7E: Using Video to Brand Science: Difference between individual content producers & institutional content
This session will explore different types of video content and the impact they have on their audience. We will discuss the nuances of education, entertainment and "edutainment" in science video and what different approaches can achieve. We will explore the difference in individual versus institutional content, branding channels on YouTube, and discuss what effective videos looks like. The discussion will focus on using video to market science, affecting how science is perceived by the general public.

Facilitator
avatar for Vanessa Hill

Vanessa Hill

Social Media Advisor, CSIRO


Friday February 28, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 8a McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioVidBrand

2:30pm

Mini-Workshop: Communicating Science Masterclass
Have you ever wanted to get up on stage to do a public science performance and then be judged in front of your peers? Us too!! That’s why we’re holding a Science Performance Masterclass at Scio14. Enter and get five minutes to do a public science *thing* -- it can be a lecture, a song, a beat poem, a stand-up set, a livedraw, or any other idea you have for presenting science. Then a panel of experts (i.e., peers) will give give feedback, all in front an audience of your peers (i.e., experts). It’s X-Factor meets Shark Tank for science. At the end we’ll crown a winner who gets to take home SciOctopus! (Note to Karyn: KIDDING.) The real prize, of course, for the performer and anyone who wants to come watch will be the feedback. Send an email to ben@storycollider.org if you’d like to enter. Let us know what you’ll do, if and when you’ve done it before. We’ll picking five acts with an eye to having a variety of types of entry & people.

Limit 40

REGISTER for this WORKSHOP here.

Workshop Leader
avatar for Ben Lillie

Ben Lillie

The Story Collider

Friday February 28, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 8b McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioMaster

2:30pm

Workshop: Creating Data-driven Visualizations for Science Communication
This workshop will focus on the intersection between design and data communication. The goal will be to explore and practice ways to present quantitative information through a series of hands-on activities. We will discuss visualizations that answer questions, tell stories, and lead or (unintentionally?) mislead audiences. We’ll also talk about ways to avoid propagating misconceptions. You are welcome to bring examples from your own work that you would like to discuss and improve with input from the group. Bring your favorite sketching tools such as markers, colored pencils, fountain pen, computer, etc.

Limit 24

Form to register for Data Driven Visualizations workshop is here
.

Workshop Leader
avatar for Rachel Levy

Rachel Levy

Associate Professor of Mathematics, Harvey Mudd College
Mathematics communication, writing across the curriculum, teaching and learning, instructional design and circus arts.

Friday February 28, 2014 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 10 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioDataViz

3:30pm

BREAK
Friday February 28, 2014 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

4:00pm

8A: Is your art (or lack thereof) sabotaging your written message?
Science wordsmiths may forget that the power of an image can exceed the power of the sword and the word. The images written communicators use – or don't use – send messages of their own, perhaps not the ones we intend. In fact, the image (or lack thereof) can sabotage the message or, at best, decrease the likelihood that others will even pay attention to it. Is a mediocre image/illustration/photo better than a poorly chosen image? Is no image better than a mediocre image? What characteristics determine whether an image undermines or underscores our message? Whether you're an experienced image communicator, a novice, or you've never given it much thought, let's talk about finding, using or making images that enhance our message.

Facilitator
avatar for Tara Haelle

Tara Haelle

Science Reporter and Blogger, Freelance and Red Wine & Apple Sauce
From my bio at www.tarahaelle.net: | With expertise in vaccines, parenting, prenatal and children's health, mental health, marine biology, test prep, children's writing, education and travel, Tara is a "Jill of many trades"


Friday February 28, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioVisual

4:00pm

8B: Upping our digital literacy
Science is becoming increasingly data driven and computationally based across the board, from the life sciences to ecology and astronomy. There is also added pressure from funders and publishers for researchers to better document and share the outputs of their work, but despite a push for better practice, we’re still facing a gap between what digital skills (analysis, computing, data management) researchers are expected to know and what they’re being taught at the university level, leaving many without the training needed to do better, more robust research. This session will look at a number of efforts to help bridge that gap such as Software Carpentry and rOpenSci, and ask more broadly what does “digital literacy” mean for science and the web. Given the chance to rethink the notion of “core competencies” needed for 21st century "open science", what should we be teaching to the next generation of researchers, and how can we ensure this training reaches those who need it most?

Facilitator
avatar for Kaitlin Thaney

Kaitlin Thaney

Director, Science, Mozilla
I lead the science program at Mozilla, where we work to make open research less of an ideal and more a norm. I care deeply about the web and research efficiency, and have worked on problems surrounding them at Digital Science, Creative Commons and MIT.


Friday February 28, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioDigLit

4:00pm

8C: [Online] Journal of Scientific Explanations
Online science information proliferates at dizzying speeds. An inquiring mind of any age can choose between roughly two first steps to know the “how” and “why” of a scientific topic: general Internet search or Wikipedia. Hence the need for a single authoritative online resource, with a concise scientific entry (i.e., backgrounder) for every topic tailored separately for first-graders to post-docs and everyone in between. This [Online] Journal of Scientific Explanations (JoSE) would follow a rigorous and completely transparent process of peer review for each entry, which would in turn be DOI’d. Such an ambitious project matches the immense talent, energy and expertise within the ScienceOnline community. Volunteers will be asked to take on tasks. Possible discussion topics include a timeline, key objectives, submission process, differentiation from other sites, source citation, coding, hosting, and finally, how to ensure the process remains transparent.

Facilitator
avatar for Kathleen Raven

Kathleen Raven

Reuters Health
Checking facts and writing stories since 1999. Earned M.S. in Ecology and M.A. in Health & Medical Journalism from the University of Georgia. Blogger for Scientific American.


Friday February 28, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 6 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioJSE

4:00pm

8D: Blog Networks: Benefits, Role of, Next Steps
Science bloggers have always had a strong sense of community. Ever since their craft caught on in the early years of the new millennium, they have worked together to share news and knowledge and stir important debates. There are group blogs like The Panda’s Thumb and The Last Word on Nothing, but more recently there has also been a proliferation of blog networks hosted by science magazines, journals, and even a newspaper. Seed Media Group was the first to assemble bloggers into such a collective when in launched ScienceBlogs.com in 2006, but other publications quickly followed suit. Today, Discover, The Guardian, National Geographic, Nature, PLoS, Popular Science, Scientific American and Wired host similar communities. In this session, we’ll discuss why science bloggers tend to band together, the advantages of joining a blog network, the role that networks play in the larger field of science communication, and what the future holds of these collectives.

Facilitator

Friday February 28, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioBlogNet

4:00pm

8E: Mini-Hackathon: Women in Science Infographic
Following on the heels of the idea-generating session (1C Women In Science: Reaching Equilibrium), this Mini-Hackathon will be an opportunity for the ScienceOnline community to collectively visualize our solutions for gender equality in science. We will generate as a group rough sketches to be developed into an information graphic of our key proposed solutions, and possibly the loose script and look/feel for a short animated video on the issue from ScienceOnline. This will be a playful, engaging, energizing, and safe space to make collective decisions and sketches about how we want to visually communicate the work this community has done on this issue. Come play with markers and visualize your solutions!

Facilitator
PI

Perrin Ireland

Senior Science Communications Specialist, Natural Resources Defense Council
Science Scribe!


Friday February 28, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 8a McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag scioHack

6:30pm

InterGalactic Gala
We'll be having a geeky InterGalactic night!

Lots of food and fun. We'll be posting the menu so that you know exactly what to expect.

We'll have Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale (and the Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream to make floats).

Bring a costume! We'll have prizes!

Got a Galactic piece of music we should add to the Playlist? Let us know!

At 9pm we'll also open up the Magnolia Rooms (downstairs at the Sheraton) for those who want a quieter place to talk, play games, etc while they enjoy some late night treats. Upstairs in the Oak Ballroom we'll continue with some fun attendee performances and end the evening w Geeky Karaoke. Everyone can feel free to meander between the rooms and find a comfortable place.

Want to help out with the fun? Let Karyn (karyn@scienceonline.com) or Brian Malow (sciencecomedian@gmail.com) know.

Friday February 28, 2014 6:30pm - 11:00pm
Oak Ballroom Sheraton
  • Hashtag #scioGalactic

9:00pm

Intergalactic Interlude
Want to unwind with some friends in a quieter atmosphere after eating and enjoying the InterGalactic fun of dinner?

We'll have a quieter venue with games, areas to sit and talk, etc (along with some late night snacks) in the Magnolia Room downstairs at the Sheraton.

Feel free to float between the two venues at the Sheraton and choose the decibel level of entertainment you want to participate in!

Friday February 28, 2014 9:00pm - 11:30pm
Magnolia Room Sheraton
 
Saturday, March 1
 

8:00am

BREAKFAST
We'll have breakfast waiting for you each morning when you arrive at the McKimmon Center!

Menu includes crustless quiche, yogurt, fruit, granola, muffins, and much more. Oh, and coffee of course!

Outside the McKimmon Center you will find the Kona Chameleon Espresso Truck! At registration everyone will receipt a free drink ticket for a specialty coffee drink.

Saturday March 1, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

9:00am

Creating Collaborations across the Wide World with the Web

We know the internet connects people across the world and we can use many resources and apps to work together. Our speakers today will help us imagine ways to push the limits of these tools of the web to envision new collaborations and discover new models for global participation.

Jon Schull (e-NABLE) 

Jon is Research Scientist at the Rochester Institute’s Center for Media, Art, Graphics, Interactivity and Creativity (MAGIC).  A sometime biological psychologist, inventor, entrepreneur, and human computer interaction researcher, his recent work concerns real-time web-based collaboration in the service of innovation, learning, and community engagement. All of these interests recently converged when he created e-NABLE, a global, online collaborative community of 3D printing enthusiasts who  design, develop, fabricate and customize  3D-printed mechanically-enhanced hand devices for children and adults who are missing fingers.

Nick Parker (e-NABLE)

Nick is 18 years old and lives in Silicon Valley, where he likes to work on just about anything that moves. Right now he's renovating a thirty-four year old CNC mill, writing a CAM program for 3D printers with a novel twist, teaching 3rd graders to use basic CAD programs, and designing a new arm for a 7 year old girl born who was born with her right forearm missing.

Information about the e-Nable group can be found here:

Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/enableorganization

Blog:  Website: E-NABLING the Future

A recent post on the blog tells about an e-NABLE collaboration that Karyn Traphagen (ScienceOnline, Executive Director) has been a part of:

http://enablingthefuture.wordpress.com/2014/01/15/collaboration-at-the-speed-of-e-nable/


CONVERGE Speaker
avatar for Jon Schull

Jon Schull

Associate Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
Research Scientist, MAGIC ACT initiative | (Media Arts Games Interaction and Creativity Center | Access and Collaboration Technology initiative)


Saturday March 1, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am
CONVERGE Room (1cd) McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioENABLE

10:00am

BREAK
Saturday March 1, 2014 10:00am - 10:30am
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

10:30am

9F: How to Communicate Uncertainty with the brevity that online communication requires
Uncertainty is a large part of the scientific process. There are always exceptions to the rule, varying amounts of uncertainty, and other factors that lead to wiggle room even when the result is widely accepted as the truth among scientists. So how do we, as science communicators, describe this uncertainty to our audience without undermining the science and the results? And then, how do we do all of this within the limits of online communication, particularly social media?

Facilitator
avatar for Caitlyn McCrary

Caitlyn McCrary

Outreach Specialist, The Baldwin Group at NOAA Coastal Services Center
science communication and education, and running.


Saturday March 1, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 8b McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioUncertainty

10:30am

9A: Social Media Platforms around the world
Social media platforms can be extremely powerful tools for disseminating and discussing science. Regularly, we’re seeing the launch of new or expanded platforms, a few of which are geared specifically towards science. But how does the use of social media vary around the world and how do you make sure you’re choosing the right platform(s) for your project? For example, is Facebook a better tool for communicating science news in the US than Pinterest? Or is Weibo a better platform than Twitter for discussing science in Asia? This session will include an overview of some common global and region-specific social media platforms. We’ll then look at differences in the popularity of scientific disciplines in different countries on social media, as determined by the altmetric.com tool. Please all come prepared to share you social media success stories.

Saturday March 1, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioPlatforms

10:30am

9B: Read the Comments (best practices for handling blog comments)
Some might say “Don’t read the comments!” Lack of moderation and free reign of trolls can be enough to make sites like Popsci shut down comments entirely. Scientific articles have shown that negative tone in comments can influence what people think of the science presented. On the other hand, some sites are embracing comments, such as Pubmed. Should you allow the comments? Which should flourish, and which should go to the spam folder? This discussion will talk about legal obligations and different types of comment policy. The goal will be to set up a guide of best practices which bloggers, old and new, might find helpful as they don’t read the comments.

Facilitator

Saturday March 1, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioComments

10:30am

9C: Mentoring/Mentorship
“How do I find or approach a potential mentor?” “How can I be a helpful mentor?” “How can I ensure that the relationship with my mentor/mentee is productive and valuable?” “What’s the right structure for a mentoring relationship?” Experienced professionals want to give back to their community through mentorship, and less experienced professionals are looking for guidance and support, but, often, neither group knows where to start. If you’ve been a mentor or mentee, come to this discussion to share what has and hasn't worked for you. If you’re on the hunt for a mentor and don’t know where to start, come and learn how to approach a potential mentor thoughtfully.

Facilitator

Saturday March 1, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 6 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioMentor

10:30am

9D: Bootstrapped Videography: the one-bag videographer/journalist
People used to print or radio reporting practice quick-start reporting: the minute the car door slams, you've got a notebook or a mic out and you're at work. We hate the video pause -- 45 minutes standing around making small talk while a shooter sets up tripod, mic, lighting, and finally prepares an interview. For years I've wanted to be a one-bag, instant videographer, at work almost as quickly as usual. For years people in video have told me that's not possible. With new equipment and methods, that's no longer true. I practice what I preach now and so do many others. In this session we'll share ideas about how to be as quick, nimble, and mobile with video as we are in less-technical storytelling modes.

Q&A Moderator
SH

Scott Huler

Scientific American


Saturday March 1, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioBootstrap

10:30am

9E: Online Media/Tools in the Higher Ed Sci World (w insights from #sciYoung team)
Skype, Google Drive, Wordpress -- we know you've heard these terms before. But how can you use them to engage your peers (or your students) in science communication? Members of this Q&A session have been involved in undergraduate-led science communication efforts at McGill, Cornell, and the University of Oregon. We've started group blogs, recruited Facebook followers, ushered student newspapers into the Internet age, and found and met with mentors out in the wilds of the internet. Come with questions about how to start, run, and promote an online publication directed at and/or made by students.


Saturday March 1, 2014 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 8a McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioSchoolTools

10:30am

Workshop: Creating a Science [Board or Online] Game w Diane Kelly
Join with fellow attendees and create a Science board, card or online game!

Limit 24

Register for this workshop here.

Workshop Leader

Saturday March 1, 2014 10:30am - 1:00pm
Room 10 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioGame

11:30am

BREAK
Saturday March 1, 2014 11:30am - 12:00am
Café (Room 1ab) McKimmon Center

12:00pm

10A: Online Communities: Meeting, Managing, Moving Forward

Community has become something of a buzzword in recent years – many projects, ScienceOnline included, use it as a way of indicating a more collaborative and participative emphasis to their activities. In this session we’ll consider various aspects of community – from basic definitions to day-to-day community management issues. We’ll mention the importance of in-person interactions, as well as online ones, and we’ll consider what the future might look like for online communities. Some questions that you might want to consider before the session include:

  • What are the indicators of a healthy community?
  • · What can be achieved on an individual and collective basis from being part of a community?
  • · What happens once a community is well established? How do you welcome new voices to combat echo chamber effects?
  • · Can communities ever be successfully cat-herded? Is a community something that can (or even should?) be planned from the ground up, or does it happen spontaneously?
  • · How much of a successful online community is about having the right technologies and/or communication strategies?
  • · Many organisations are now looking to build communities around their products and activities; is this a recipe for conflict or an opportunity for more two-way conversations?

If you’re part of – or a manger of - any community, do come along and add your input to the conversation! 


Saturday March 1, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 3 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioCommunity

12:00pm

10B: Upholding Standards in blogs (research & journalism)
Science bloggers are a diverse group of professionals, many of whom have been trained as journalists and/or scientists. This session will discuss what journalistic and scientific standards should a science blog uphold. Examples of potential discussion topics include issues surrounding accuracy, neutrality, objectivity, criticism and anonymity when blogging about specific scientific research studies, academic life, peer review or science policy and funding. A typical blog post only runs only 500-1500 words, which may make it even more challenging to uphold all standards in all blog posts, but are we allowed to pick and choose? Can a blog post focus on accurately explaining a scientific study without necessarily providing criticism of the study? Should blog posts routinely provide a "second perspective"? Can we agree on standards for how to deal with comments made by readers?

Facilitator

Saturday March 1, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 4 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioStandards

12:00pm

10C: Imagine: Future of Scholarly Communications in 10-20 years
In the early days and incarnations of Science Online we talked a lot about a future for research communication which was not just on the web, but of the web. Looking back now, many of the changes we predicted (or wished for!) have happened, or at least are happening. From our perspective of 2014, with Open Access a reality, dynamic publications appearing, and experiments in pre- and post-publication peer review gathering pace, what can we see if we look not just a few years down the road but far out into the future. What might change? What will probably not change? And how can we extrapolate from the trends we see today into the far future?

Facilitator

Saturday March 1, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 6 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioImagine

12:00pm

10D: Ethics, Genomes & Public Involvement in Science
Advances in genomics have rapidly moved the study of human genomes and microbiomes into the public sphere. With this advancement comes opportunity to engage directly in research and gain access to information relevant to one’s health and well-being, information that participants may also feel compelled to share online. We’ll explore ethics and privacy issues related to the growing field of citizen “-omics” by asking: What are the consequences of the public’s enthusiasm for sharing their personal results online? How do project organizers adequately communicate open-ended risk affiliated with participation in these studies? Are Institutional Review Boards ready for Human Subjects research in the era of social media and online engagement? For journalists writing openly about their participation in these projects, what were the consequences (positive or negative) of sharing one's experience? To what extent will crowd-funding and open-access data policies change the way we think about privacy and ethics?

Facilitator
avatar for Holly Menninger

Holly Menninger

Director of Public Science, Your Wild Life, NC State


Saturday March 1, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 7 McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioEthics

12:00pm

10E: Viral Downward Spiral: Can we anticipate science controversies?
In November the FDA sent an unvarnished nastygram to direct-to-consumer genetic testing provider 23andMe telling the company that it had to stop marketing its product because it was, in the FDA’s eyes, misleading the public and offering unfounded medical advice. The company had been in trouble with regulatory authorities before and was a favorite punching bag of the medical establishment since it launched in 2007. Yet somehow none of its prior contretemps provoked anything like the media firestorm that followed the FDA’s cease-and-desist letter. In this session we will ask why? What if anything was different about this particular online dumpster fire? Was the reaction purely a function of the precipitating event itself? Or do social media make such feeding frenzies inevitable? How is this case instructive to us as science writers?

Facilitator

Saturday March 1, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 8a McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioNews

12:00pm

10F: Science + Comics + Internet: Continuing the Conversation
After a very quick slideshow of some contemporary science comics, we will discuss the advantages and drawbacks of using this medium to communicate science and where it fits in with the wider goals and styles of online science communication. Special considerations for this medium, such as balancing brevity and accuracy, will be discussed alongside the intersection of humor and science.

Facilitator
avatar for Katie McKissick

Katie McKissick

Beatrice the Biologist
Science comics and a book! What's in Your Genes?


Saturday March 1, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 8b McKimmon Center
  • Hashtag #scioComics

1:00pm

Lunch: Discussions
Tables will be organized around attendee-suggested topics -- especially topics that we haven't had a chance to talk about during a session. We will have sign-up boards where you can write a topic down for a table. Here's your chance to tie up loose ends, plan for future contact, or explore new ideas with new friends.


Saturday March 1, 2014 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Lunch Room (2abc) McKimmon Center

2:30pm

LOOKING FORWARD
This final CONVERGE session will be our time to summarize and to look forward.

We'll have a lightning round summary of all the sessions. Each session will have a 60-second snippet to share one highlight or take-away.

Exciting information about ScienceOnline Together 2015 will be shared!

Saturday March 1, 2014 2:30pm - 4:00pm
CONVERGE Room (1cd) McKimmon Center